IUS - The Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society

The Morris Janowitz Career Achievement Award

The Morris Janowitz Career Achievement Award is awarded by the Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society to a limited number of senior scholars whose careers most demonstrate excellence in the study of armed forces and society and important service to the discipline. Perhaps the criteria for the award are best described by the careers of the outstanding scholars chosen to receive it to date: Charles C. Moskos, Sam C. Sarkesian, Moshe Lissak, David R. Segal, Bernard Boene, and James Burk.

Morris Janowitz Biography

 

 

 

 

2013 Recipients

Reuven Gal

Click here to read James Burk's introductory remarks for Reuven Gal.

Reuven Gal has experience in both military, academic, government and non-government arenas. He served in the Israeli Defense Forces (IDF) as a combat infantry officer and later as the IDF’s Chief Psychologist. He retired with the rank of Colonel. While in the service, he earned a Ph.D. in Psychology from the University of California—Berkley. Since then he has led an active career in public service and in the academy.

Dr. Gal served as the Deputy National Security Advisor on Israel’s National Security Council, founded, and also headed the Administration for National Civic Service, under the Prime Minister's Office. He founded and directed the Israeli Institute for Military Studies, naming Morris Janowitz as its honorary president. He is also the Founding Chair of The Association of Civil-Military Studies in Israel

Dr.Gal is currently enjoying a dual academic position as a Senior Research Fellow -- at the Dan Shomron Institute for Social, Security and Peace Studies at the Kinneret College on the Sea of Galilee; and at the Samuel Neaman Institute for National Policy Research at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology.

Dr. Gal sits on the IUS Council, and on the Editorial Board of Armed Forces & Society. He has authored and edited six books, and published numerous articles and book chapters.

Gal is married to Ivria. They have five children and eleven grandchildren.

Click here to read Dr. Gal's full remarks on the receipt of the Morris Janowitz Career Achievement Award.

John Allen ("Jay") Williams

Click here to read James Burk's introductory remarks for John Allen Williams.

John Allen ("Jay") Williams is Professor of Political Science at Loyola University Chicago and a Master Teacher in the College of Arts and Sciences. He is immediate past Chair and President of the Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society and remains on the IUS Council and Board of Directors. He is on the Board of Directors of the Pritzker Military Museum and Library and is co-organizer and past President of the International Security and Arms Control Section of the American Political Science Association. His academic degrees are from Grinnell College (B.A.) and the University of Pennsylvania (M.A. and Ph.D.). His writings include works on professional military education, civil-military relations, military culture, military professionalism and leadership, personnel issues, military strategy, military forces and missions, catastrophic terrorism, defense organization, and strategic policy. He is a frequent media commentator whose lectures, travels, and professional appearances have taken him to six continents.

Dr. Williams’ latest book is U.S. National Security: Policymakers, Processes, and Politics (with Sam C. Sarkesian and Stephen J. Cimbala). Previous books include The Postmodern Military: Armed Forces After the Cold War (with Charles C. Moskos and David R. Segal), Soldiers, Society, and National Security (with Sam C. Sarkesian and Fred B. Bryant)

Dr. Williams retired as a Captain in the U.S. Navy Reserve with 30 years of commissioned service. A designated Strategic Plans Officer, his personal awards include the Legion of Merit, the Meritorious Service Medal (two awards), and the Navy and Marine Corps Commendation and Achievement Medals.

Click here to read Dr. William's full remarks on the receipt of the Morris Janowitz Career Achievement Award.



2011 Recipients

Christopher Dandeker

Christopher Dandeker holds the only chair in Military Sociology in the UK in the Department of War Studies at King's College London. After receiving his BSc and PhD degrees in Sociology at Leicester. He moved to King's in 1990. With Simon Wessely [from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's), he co-founded and became co-Director of the King's Centre for Military Health Research.

His research interests focus on: the changing character of war and the role of the military; military health and well being; recruitment, retention, and resettlement of military personnel; civil-military relations, etc.

Dandeker has co-authored and edited five books, the most recent of which is Les Armees en Europe, as well as written numerous journal articles and book chapters. He has served as an independent member of the UK's Defence Science Advisory Council and is currently working on a project funded by the UK's Economic and Social Research Council.

Mady Wechsler Segal

Mady Wechsler Segal earned her Ph.D. at the University of Chicago. She is Professor Emerita of Sociology at the University of Maryland, where she has been Distinguished Scholar Teacher, faculty affiliate of the Women's Studies Department, Associate Director of the Center for Research on Military Organization, and Associate Dean for Undergraduate Studies.

She has served as chair of the Scientific Advisory Committee for the U.S. Army Research Institute's Army Family Research Program, as a member of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Performance of Military Personnel.

Segal's research on military personnel issues has focused on military women, military families, and race/ethnicity in the military. She is the author of many scholarly articles and reports for military leaders and policy makers, including What We Know About Army Families: 2007 Update and How to Support Families during Overseas Deployments: A Sourcebook for Service Providers.



2009 Recipients

Bernard Boëne

Bernard Boëne has been instrumental in the renaissance of military sociology in Europe. He has helped shaped a generation of French officers, first as professeur agrégé of English, then of Sociology, and finally as Dean at the École Spéciale Militaire de Saint-Cyr (ESM) and the other military schools at Coëtquidan, as well as teaching at the universities of Rennes and Toulouse. The capstone of his career as an educator was service as Recteur de l'Académie de La Réunion.

Boëne's research includes his 1995 dissertation on the development of military sociology in the United States, the published version of which is required reading for military sociologists. His other seminal publications cover the range of issues in military sociology, and have been published in books and in the major journals in our field. One of his latest projects is a new electronic journal in military sociology.

His scholarly service over the years includes being Associate Editor of Armed Forces & Society, a member of the IUS Council, Vice-President of the Re-search Committee on Armed Forces and Conflict Resolution of the International Sociological Association, and past President of the European Research Group on the Military and Society (ERGOMAS).

James Burk

James Burk is a leading figure in military sociology whose research examines the military in liberal democracies. His publications have engaged and shaped sociological debates about the use of force, the citizen-soldier, the military profession, military culture, and theories of civil-military relations.

He is especially concerned with issues that lie on the frontier between sociology and ethics, such as the military obligations of citizens and the line between blind and responsible obedience. His recent research examines patterns of race relations within the military through the prism of local justice theory.

Burk studied military sociology under Morris Janowitz while a graduate student at the University of Chicago and has long been active in the Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society. He has served on the IUS Council since 1991 and chairs its publications committee. He edited Armed Forces & Society from 1995 to 1998 and remains an active member of the journal's editorial board. He is a professor of sociology at Texas A&M University, specializing in military sociology, political sociology and social theory.



2007 Recipients

Moshe Lissak

Moshe Lissak is one of the most renowned scholars of civil-military relations. He is Professor Emeritus of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at Hebrew University in Jerusalem. He received his Ph.D. from the Hebrew University in 1963 and traveled to the United States to study with Morris Janowitz. In addition to Lissak's critically acclaimed expertise on Burma and Thailand, he also became a distinguished scholar of Israeli civil-military relations and Israeli sociological history.

Lissak's books include Military Roles In Modernization: Civil-Military Relations In Thailand and Burma and Trouble in Utopia: The Overburdened Polity of Israel.

Lissak has been an important participant in the Inter-University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society, and a contributor to and associate editor of Armed Forces & Society. Lissak truly captures what it means to be the ideal intellectual of civil-military relations with his groundbreaking work in the field and profound engagement in theoretical and sociological debate and dialogue.

David R. Segal

David R. Segal is a preeminent sociologist, directly influencing defense policy in the U.S. through research, consultation, and service work. His over 150 scholarly journal articles, the highly regarded book, Recruiting for Uncle Sam, and the cogent America's Military Population monograph (co-authored with Mady Weschler Segal) are widely read.

His unparalleled ability to render complex sociological issues intelligible to lay, international, and other non-academic audiences has made him a widely sought-after mass media commentator and public speaker in the United States and abroad. He is considered an exemplary collaborator, as he was in the co-edited volume The Postmodern Military, because the rigor of his work makes for cutting-edge and frequently referenced sources.

Finally, Segal continues to educate, inspire, and mentor generations of students, teachers and practitioners -- civilian and military -- thereby leaving a lasting legacy regarding matters of the military.



2005 Recipients

Charles C. Moskos

Charlie Moskos was a former IUS Chair and President. He was a tireless contributor of scholarly work, most of which had practical applications and some of which stirred public debate. He was justly proud of his ancestry and honored his heritage by his prominent scholarship on Greek Americans. He was among the very few sociologists who studied enlisted soldiers in the field where they were deployed, both in peace and in war. His work on minority soldiers revealed the conditions under which a Jim Crow military became a model for race relations that civilian institutions might follow.

Early in his career, he developed the Institutional/Occupational hypothesis as a means to promote comparative historical studies of military organization and military change. This hypothesis evolved into the Postmodern Military model, which helped predict the course of civil-military relations after the end of the Cold War. He never shied away from, but helped to guide, heated public debates about, for instance, the rights of conscientious objectors and the integration of women and gays into the armed forces. During the Clinton administration, he coined the term, "Don't Ask, Don't Tell," as a name for the policy he proposed, the policy eventually adopted, that steered between punishing members of the military because they were gay and allowing gays to serve openly.

His contributions were not confined to his leading role as a scholar and public intellectual. Much of the intellectual vitality and practical success of our organization is due to Charlie Moskos. He worked tirelessly to organize conferences, to enlist the help of others to ensure that our organization could survive financially, and to support the work of scholars young and old.

Sam C. Sarkesian

Sam Sarkesian was a former IUS Chair and President. He was the epitome of a soldier-scholar. His military service began as an enlisted man serving in the constabulary force in Germany after World War Two. He returned for undergraduate studies at The Citadel, where he graduated cum laude after three years. Commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the Army, he was one of the first men chosen for the elite 10th Special Forces by its founder, the legendary Colonel Aaron Bank. He served during the Korean War on an island located above the 38th parallel on the west coast of Korea. He joined the 11th Airborne Division for service in Germany and the First Infantry Division for service in Vietnam. He then taught a future generation of Army leaders as a member of the prestigious Social Science Department at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point.

His decorations include the Bronze Star with Combat V Device and Oak Leaf Cluster, the Legion of Merit, and the Army Commendation Medal. He wore the Combat Infantry Badge and was glider qualified -- one of the last to receive this certification -- and a Master Parachutist with 85 jumps. He retired from the Army in 1968 at the rank of Lt. Colonel, and received his Ph.D. at Columbia University.

After the Army, Sam turned with his customary energy to his second career as a full-time academician. Shortly after returning to Chicago, he fell in with University of Chicago social scientist Morris Janowitz, the founder of the discipline of civil military relations and of the Inter- University Seminar on Armed Forces and Society. He was Janowitz's choice to succeed him as IUS Chair and President when Janowitz stepped down in 1982, and he led our organization with great skill for five years as it became a truly international and interdisciplinary organization.

Sam's scholarly record is astonishingly prodigious, even without considering that he began publishing only after the completion of his Army career. It includes some 20 books and 25 articles and book chapters. The titles of these indicate the range and depth of his intellect and his contributions to scholarship: The Professional Army Officer in a Changing Society -- his first book, and one that still reads very well; America's Forgotten Wars: The Counterrevolutionary Past and Lessons for the Future; The U.S. Military Profession Into the 21st Century: War, Peace, and Politics (written with Rob Connor); The New Battlefield: The United States and Unconventional Conflicts; Soldiers, Society, and National Security; U.S. National Security: Policymakers, Processes, and Politics; and the recently re-issued classic, Revolutionary Guerrilla Warfare: Theories, Doctrines, and Contexts.